RV Insurance Blog Image

Importance of RV Insurance

For many, their trailer or motorhome is their home away from home. It is important to take the proper steps toward protecting your investment by purchasing RV insurance. There are several benefits to having an RV insurance policy including protection, roadside assistance and more. We know insurance can be a daunting and difficult topic – we are here to make it simple for you!

What is RV Insurance?

RV Insurance protects you in the event that you are responsible for any damages or injuries and covers any associated costs with the damages to your own RV if an incident occurs. There are a few different coverages contingent on how your recreational vehicle is used, such as if your camper is your full-time residence or if you use it recreationally. Specific RV coverage also varies depending on what type of RV you have, motorized or towable.If you own a motorized recreational vehicle, coverage can be required. Whereas a towable may not require special RV insurance, depending on which state you live in. No matter what type of RV you own, it is always a good idea to be insured in the case of an unexpected accident.

What are the benefits of having RV insurance?

When deciding to purchase an RV insurance policy, all of the associated benefits and perks can be confusing. Depending on your particular insurance company, you might have the option to choose additional coverage options such as: total loss replacement coverage, vacation liability, towing and roadside coverage, uninsured and underinsured motorists coverage, and more. Three main benefits that come with having a specialized RV insurance plan include: asset protection, liability protection and roadside assistance.

Asset Protection

Recreational vehicles aren’t cheap no matter what type you purchase, and unfortunately, accidents happen. Natural threats like hail, fire and storms can compromise your investment and cause substantial damage. Having RV insurance can help cover the physical damage caused and save you additional out-of-pocket expenses. You will also find that some insurance policies have the option to add coverage for your personal belongings kept in your RV. Those who use their RV as a second home will find it essential to select a policy that covers personal belongings such as electronics, household items, clothes, and more.

Liability Protection

Just like when you are driving your car, you can sometimes be found at fault for an accident while out on the road or at a campsite. When you park your recreational vehicle at the campsite, you might be held liable in the event that someone is hurt around or in your camper. In the event of an accident, bodily injury or property damage, you will want to be covered by an insurance policy. Your RV insurance liability protection can come to the rescue when you are facing any accident-related costs.

Roadside Assistance

Roadside assistance is one of the best benefits available with many RV insurance policies. Often RVers find themselves in a situation where their trailer or motorhome needs to be towed. Be sure to talk to your insurance company to find out if roadside assistance is included in your RV insurance policy. If roadside assistance isn’t included with your insurance policy, we encourage you to check out our RV Club which provides RVers with additional benefits and perks while out on the road exploring.

How much RV insurance do I need?

Your RV insurance agency will help you find the policy that best fights your personal needs and any other unique requirements that may be in place. Often the amount of coverage that you need depends on a variety of factors including:

  • The requirements of the state you currently reside in
  • The type of recreational vehicle that you own
  • Whether you are using your RV full-time or part-time

If you have decided to finance your motorhome, fifth wheel, travel trailer, toy hauler, or destination trailer, your loan lender will most likely require you to have RV insurance coverage for physical damages. It is common that your lender will require certain deductibles and will want to be listed on the policy as a lien holder.

Where can I purchase RV insurance?

RVsurance can help you get a specialized recreational vehicle insurance quote quickly and easily. Their insurance agents will help find the perfect policy from one of their partner carriers that will protect your travel trailer, fifth wheel, toy hauler, tent camper, or Class A, B, or C Motorhome. Regardless of how you and your family like to travel, RVsurance is here to help provide you with the best RV insurance policies available. Get your specialized quote online today!

Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park

The United States National Park system offers travelers several opportunities to explore unique landscapes, view beautiful scenery, and encounter a wide variety of wildlife. Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, and parts of Montana and Idaho, is nearly 3,500 sq. miles of wilderness atop a volcanic hot spot and was the world’s first national park. When you choose to travel to this gorgeous park, you will find dramatic canyons, hot springs, lush forests and more including the famous geyser, Old Faithful. Yellowstone is home to several animal species including wolves, bison, elk, and bears. Yellowstone is perfect for all types of camping lifestyles including traditional tent camping and RV camping. Start planning your trip to Yellowstone National Park today – you don’t want to miss it!

Fast Facts

Yellowstone Entrance Passes:

  • For non-commercial, private vehicles, a 7-day pass costs $35 per vehicle. Keep in mind that this does not include entrance to Grand Teton National Park which is also nearby. Visitors that are entering through Yellowstone’s South Entrance will be traveling through Grand Teton National Park first and will be required to pay entrance fees to both parks.
  • Visitors can also purchase an annual park pass for $70 per vehicle or an ‘America the Beautiful – Annual Pass’ for $80 which is honored at all federally-managed land units such as national parks, national forests, national monuments, and more. For more information on entrance fees, reference the National Park Service.

Best Time to Visit:

  • Summer is a fantastic time to take a trip to visit Yellowstone National Park thanks to the warm weather and all park amenities being open. However, this is the most crowded travel time of the year for the park. If you are looking to avoid crowds, a good time to visit is September or early October.

How Many Days To Plan For:

  • Plan to spend at least 2 to 3 days in Yellowstone National Park to be able to hit some of the most desired locations. Two days in the park gives you plenty of time to see the most popular attractions such as Old Faithful. Adding an additional day gives you time to explore and view some of the less visited attractions. Check out this Yellowstone National Park Travel Guide for an itinerary to make the most of your time.

Where to Stay:

  • Yellowstone National Park has 12 campgrounds and an RV park that are perfect for those who like being right in the middle of the beautiful outdoors. If you aren’t planning to camp or take your recreational vehicle, the Old Faithful Inn and Canyon Lodge & Cabins are two of the best places to stay and are both close to the most popular places in the park. If you are wanting to stay outside the park, we would suggest hotels in West Yellowstone, Montana.

Pet Policy:

  • Unfortunately, pets are not allowed on any of the hiking trails within Yellowstone National Park and cannot be left unattended. To learn more about Yellowstone’s pet policy, reference the National Park Service.

Park History

The Yellowstone region has been called home for more than 11,000 years by several tribes and bands. These groups of people used the park as their hunting ground, transportation route and home prior to and even after the arrival of the European American settlers. In 1872, Yellowstone was established as the world’s first national park. The railroad arrived at the park in 1883 which allowed visitors to more easily access the park’s beautiful landscape. In 1915, automobiles were first allowed into the park so that visits were more economical for travelers. The US Army managed Yellowstone until 1916 at which point the National Park Service was established. Today, Yellowstone National Park is protected and preserved by a number of management divisions and departments so that generations for years to come are able to enjoy these natural wonders and learn more about the history of the land.

Top Park Features

  1. Yellowstone is a supervolcano! Did you know that one of the world’s largest active volcanoes lies just beneath Yellowstone National Park? The first major eruption took place over 2 million years ago and covered over 5m000 sq. miles with ash. While this volcano is still considered active, there has been no active lava flow in over 70,000 years.
  2. Old Faithful erupts more frequently than many other large geysers. This geyser got its name in 1870 from its regularity of eruption, although never at exact hourly intervals. Yellowstone has more geysers than anywhere else on Earth, and Old Faithful typically erupts around 17 times a day.
  3. Half the world’s hydrothermal features can be found at Yellowstone. This national park preserves over 10,000 hydrothermal features which include hot springs, mud pots, geysers, and travertine terraces. These features get their brilliant colors from microorganisms called thermophiles, which are heat-loving organisms.
  4. The wildlife causes several traffic jams. Yellowstone has much more to offer than just geysers, it is also known for its bison herds. This park is the only place where bison have lived since prehistoric times and they often cause traffic jams (also known as bison jams), as cars wait for them to cross the road.
  5. Yellowstone is home to the largest concentration of animals in the lower 48 states. The wildlife at Yellowstone National Park is abundant and diverse with an estimated 67 species of mammals, 300 species of birds, and 16 different types of fish. Some of the mammals that call Yellowstone home include grizzly bears, lynx, foxes, elk, wolves and moose. Although beautiful, please remember to not approach them. The park rules state that you must be at least 25 yards from large animals and at least 100 years from wolves and bears.
Yellowstone Bison Herd
Grand Prismatic Pool

Things To Do

Hot Springs
Yellowstone’s beautiful hydrothermal areas are home to several features such as pots of bubbling mud, geysers, and hot springs. Fun fact: Hot springs are the most common hydrothermal features in this national park. Each temperature in the hot springs has its very own set of microorganisms, which provide a different color. This is the reason why the hot springs have those amazing bands of color that expand from the center.

Top hot springs to visit at Yellowstone National Park:

  • Crested Pool (Upper Geyser Basin)
  • Sapphire Pool (Biscuit Basin, part of Upper Geyser Basin)
  • Turquoise Pool (Midway Geyser Basin)
  • Fountain Paint Pot (Lower Geyser Basin)
  • Blue Funnel Spring (West Thumb Geyser Basin)


Hiking Trails

From beautiful waterfalls and deeply carved canyons, one of the best ways to see the true beauty that lies within Yellowstone National Park is to hop on the trails and take a hike. When preparing for your hike, be sure to dress in layers since the temperatures can fluctuate drastically from day to night. It is smart to wear moisture-wicking hiking shirts and warm fleece layers to stay comfortable all day long. It is crucial to carry safety gear and plenty of water. Yellowstone is bear country so don’t forget the bear spray!

Best hikes in Yellowstone National Park:

  • Wraith Falls (1 mile)
  • Fairy Falls (4.8 miles)
  • Grand Prismatic Overlook Trail (1.5 miles)
  • Upper Geyser Basin and Old Faithful Observation Point Loop (4.9 miles)
  • Lone Star Geyser Trail (5.3 miles)
  • North Rim Trail (6.4 miles)
  • Trout Lake Loop (1.2 miles)

Geysers
One of the most famous attractions in Yellowstone National Park is its magnificent geyser basins. These hydrothermal features are the reason that the U.S. Congress established Yellowstone as the world’s first national park. Visitors will find the world’s tallest geyser, Steamboat Geyser, and the previously discussed, Old Faithful. These geysers and hundreds of others are accessible and visible from various trails and boardwalks.

Most notable geyser basins in Yellowstone:

  • Norris Geyser Basin: Crackling Lake, Porcelain Springs, Emerald Spring, Cistern Spring, Echinus Geyser, and Steamboat Geyser
  • Upper Geyser Basin: Old Faithful, Castle Geyser, Riverside Geyser, Grand Geyser, Castle Geyser, Crested Pool, Morning Glory Pool, Sapphire Pool, Emerald Pool, Beauty Pool, and Punch Bowl Spring
  • Lower Geyser Basin: Fountain Paint Pot, Great Fountain Geyser, and White Dome Geyser
  • Midway Geyser Basin: Excelsior Geyser Crater, Turquoise Pool, and Grand Prismatic Spring

Lakes & Waterfalls
Yellowstone National Park has over 150 named lakes. The most famous being Yellowstone Lake which is more than 7,000 feet above sea level (making it North America’s largest high-elevation lake), spans 139 square miles, and features 141 miles of shoreline. Lakes in Yellowstone are home to a variety of wildlife including native fish species and an immense bird population. Be on the lookout for eagles and trumpeter swans!

Visitors can also look forward to hundreds of waterfalls, several of which are visible from roadside viewpoints and overlooks otherwise known as “frontcountry”. Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River drops down 308 feet into the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone. We also suggest you check out Gibbon Falls, Kepler Cascades, Rustic Falls, and Undine Falls.

Yellowstone Lower Falls

Campgrounds
Yellowstone National Park has 12 campgrounds with over 2,000 established campsites for its visitors. All campsites must be reserved in advance, except for Mammoth Campground which has first come, first served sites from mid-October to the beginning of April. Reservations book up fast so be sure to mark your campsite reservations early in advance. Fishing Bridge RV Park (no tents) is the only campground that offers water, sewer, and electrical hookups. Keep in mind that dump stations may close when the temperatures reach below freezing.

Stay tuned for more National Park Travel Guides from the ROUTE 66 RV Network!

RV Loans and Financing

RV Loans & Financing Insights

Deciding to purchase a recreational vehicle is a big investment for new and experienced RVers alike. If this is your first RV purchase, the varying loan options and extra requirements may seem overwhelming and daunting. Fortunately, the ROUTE 66 RV Network offers customers like you their knowledge of the RV loan and financing process and the experience to make it a more simple, understandable process.

Additionally, the ROUTE 66 RV Network has formed valuable partnerships with Bank of America and Bank of the West to provide customers with the best and most competitive interest rates available. You can feel confident making financial decisions surrounding your new investment with their expertise. Medallion Bank also provides non-prime loans that are suitable for those with lower credit scores but are wanting to finance their new recreational vehicle.

Ready to learn more? Check out our list of Frequently Asked Questions or get in touch with your local ROUTE 66 RV Network Dealer. Our member dealers are ready and willing to provide you with the answers you’ve been looking for on how to maximize the enjoyment of your purchase and maintain financial flexibility. In fact, many first-time RVers come to us to check out their financial options before starting their shopping experience. That’s what we are here for!

Frequently Asked Loan Questions

Q: What are the benefits of financing my RV purchase?

A: When you choose to finance your RV purchase instead of liquidating your assets or paying cash, you are able to maintain personal financial flexibility and potentially qualify for some of the benefits that come with having a second home mortgage. To qualify, your RV must have basic sleeping arrangements, cooking facilities, and a bathroom. To receive more specific details please contact your tax advisor.


Q: What are the advantages of financing through an RV Lending Specialist?

A: Some of the benefits of financing your purchase through an RV Lending Specialist include lower down payments, longer finance terms, and lower monthly payments. By setting a monthly payment within your budget, you leave the dealership knowing that you can confidently pay off your RV over a substantial period of time instead of all at once. RV financing specialists understand that recreational vehicles maintain their value and resale appeal so they tend to offer more pleasing terms and help you afford your dream RV.


Q: What types of RVs can be financed?

A: You are able to finance several types of new and pre-owned RVs including Class A Motorhomes, Class B Motorhomes, Class C Motorhomes, Fifth Wheels, Travel Trailers, Pop-Up Campers, Truck Campers and Destination Trailers (Park Models).

Q: How is my interest rate determined?

A: The physical purchase of your new recreational vehicle is dependent on the approval of your credit which is dependent on several factors such as your credit history, ability to make timely payments, and proof of your income. RV loans have extended terms that can be anywhere from 8 to 15 years depending on if you are purchasing a new or pre-owned camper. Interest rates are dependent on your total loan amount, your down payment, your overall credit profile, and the current value of your recreational vehicle. Once your application is processed, your dealership finance representative will provide you with complete information on your loan interest rate.

Q: Will I need a down payment and if so, how much?

A: Some dealerships require a down payment of at least 10 percent of the recreational vehicle purchase price, but many do prefer up to 20 percent down. A larger down payment will help lower your monthly payments and might even help you qualify for a lower interest rate.


Q: Do I need RV Insurance for an RV Loan?

A: If you are choosing to finance your motorhome, travel trailer, fifth wheel, or destination trailer, your loan lender will typically require you to have physical damage coverages for that vehicle. Be sure to review your policy to ensure that you have the coverage you need to protect yourself and your recreational vehicle.

10 Stops on Route 66 in Missouri

Did you know that St. Louis is the largest city on Route 66 and that the Gateway Arch is America’s tallest monument? Well, you do now! There are many can’t-miss stops along the Mother Road in Missouri including a historic drive-in theater, unique museums, and stunning caverns. Next time you are taking a good ole’ midwestern road trip, be sure to stop at one or all of these Missouri travel spots.

 

Route 66 Red Rocker

This enormous structure was built in 2008, situated at the Fanning 66 Outpost, and once held the Guinness World Record for being the world’s largest rocking chair. Although that title has not held out, it is still the largest rocker on Route 66. Be sure to stop at this great photo opportunity located in Fanning, Missouri.

Route 66 Museum

The Route 66 Museum is located in the Laclede County Library. The exhibits are fun for the whole family to walk through including an old gas station, an antique motel room, and a diner replica. Check out their collection of collectibles and vintage maps – the salt and pepper shakers from different Route 66 restaurants is a favorite!

Route 66 State Park

Route 66 State Park provides easy access to the Meramec River and is a welcomed break for travelers who want to enjoy nature and take in the historical showcasing of the U.S. Route 66. Bridgehead Inn, a 1935 roadhouse, serves as Route 66 State Park’s Visitor Center.

Uranus, Missouri

Located along U.S. Route 66 and I-44 in rural Pulaski County, Uranus offers fun humor for travelers of all ages. This tourist attraction is home to the world-famous Uranus Fudge Factory And General Store, a gun range, tattoo shop, sports bar, and it doesn’t stop there! If you are looking for another photo opportunity, don’t skip out on the World’s Largest Belt Buckle.

Route 66 Mural City

Cuba, Missouri was designated as the “Route 66 Mural City” in 2002 by the state legislature. These murals were a result of the development of Viva Cuba, a beautification organization, making this particular stretch of the historic highway unforgettable.

66 Drive-In Theatre

If you are a movie buff, then a stop at the 66 Drive-In Theatre is a must! As one of the last remaining along Route 66, this drive-in typically opens to the public during the first weekend of April and plays movies through mid-September. Each showing consists of two movies and includes a nostalgic intermission trailer.

Meramec Caverns

The Meramec Caverns are a 7.4K cavern system that has been a popular tourist attraction along Route 66 since 1935. Legends say that Jesse James used to utilize these caverns as a hideout spot and used the river within to make an escape!

Gateway Arch

The St. Louis Gateway Arch stands 192m tall and 192m wide making it the tallest monument in the United States. Visitors can reach the observation deck by using the elevator system that consists of a series of small pod-like tram cars. If it is a clear day, the view from the observation deck can stretch for roughly 30 miles. Each tram tour has an expected duration of 45 to 60 minutes and pricing starts at $11.

Gary’s Gay Parita

Gary’s Gay Parita was constructed as a re-creation of a classic 1930s Sinclair Gas Station. This stop in Ash Grove, Missouri features original gas pumps and other various pieces of Route 66 memorabilia.

Chain of Rocks Bridge

The Chain of Rocks Bridge in St. Louis was once used to cross the Mississippi River, but now it only has walking and biking trails. The most notable feature of this historic bridge is the 22-degree curve in the middle which is unlike any bridge we see today.

Traveling Route 66 in New Mexico

10 Stops on Route 66 in New Mexico

New Mexico is known for its famous chiles, stunning landscapes, and diverse selection of attractions. You won’t want to miss out on the first atomic bomb test site or the beautiful caves. The next time you are driving through the Land of Enchantment, be sure to plan for these interesting and unique stops along U.S. Highway 66 in New Mexico.

Blue Swallow Motel

The Blue Swallow Motel takes you back in time to the height of Route 66’s popularity and the days of sock hops and poodle skirts. This traditional motor court has been perfectly preserved and is fit with period-appropriate amenities.

Route 66 Neon Drive-Thru Sign

If you are looking for a cool photo location to mark your trip, be sure to check out the Route 66 neon drive-thru sign in Grants, New Mexico. This sign is shaped like a giant Route 66 highway shield sign and has a drive-thru portal that is big enough to fit RVs. This location is best to visit after dusk when the sign is fully illuminated.

El Rancho Hotel

R.E. Griffith opened El Rancho Hotel in 1937 as a base for movie operations. It offered excellent service and was in close proximity to several iconic Wild West locations and towns. The hotel also hosted many Hollywood stars like Errol Flynn, Katherine Hepburn, Humphrey Bogart, and John Wayne. The hotel started to slowly decline when people began to travel I-40 instead of Route 66. It was bound to face a wrecking ball in the 1980s, but a businessman bought the hotel and restored it to its original glory.

Richardson’s Trading Company

Richardson’s Trading Company is one of the oldest and most respected old-school trading companies around. You will find a bit of everything here: kachina dolls, headdresses, and Navajo wool rugs. This also makes for a good place to pick up decade-old treasures from the long-standing pawn shop.

Whiting Brothers

Way back when in New Mexico, the Whiting Brothers had gas stations and hotels dotted all along the U.S. Route 66 in Gallup, Tucumcari, Moriarty, and between McCartys and San Fidel. The Moriarty station is the last operating location amidst the iconic chain. Today, people know it as Sal & Inez’s Service Station which features the refurbished red and yellow Whiting Brothers sign.

Kelly’s Brew Pub

If you choose to dine on the patio of Kelly’s Brew Pub, you will have the opportunity to look right out over the historic Route 66. This pub is also the former home of an old service station and dealership, Jones Motor Company. The Route 66-era garage was designed to attract customers and was one of the first westbound icons along the highway.

KiMo Theatre

KiMo Theatre has been a landmark in Albuquerque since it opened its doors in 1927. It has an oddly ornate Pueblo Deco style that is distinguishable from the street, but the true treat is the interior. The interior features various significant Pueblo symbols including rain clouds, buffalo skulls, and birds. The name is said to be a combination of the two Tewa words meaning “mountain lion” or “king of its kind”.

San Miguel Church

Prior to 1938, when the highway was realigned, Route 66 went through Santa Fe, NM. Along the original route was the San Miguel Church, which is America’s oldest church dating back to 1610. The original adobe walls and altar were constructed by the Tlaxcalan Indians who accompanied Don Juan Onate from Mexico.

Comet II

A poll from Route 66 enthusiasts voted this throw-back diner as one of the top 20 places to eat along the “Mother Road”. Comet opened in 1929 and has been in the same family for several generations. It is well-known for its made-from-scratch Mexican fare such as dishes featuring the famous “PDL green chile” from Puerto del Luna. This diner was originally a drive-in, but it hasn’t had any carhops since 1994 when the original Comet burned down, hence the name Comet II.

New Mexico ChilesTucumcari Ranch Supply

Amongst all the hardware and feed at this ranch supply store, you will find a unique array of trailer parts, tourist gear, western wear, and rusty treasures. One of the biggest surprises you will find is the bakery, which has an extensive donut menu and features Watson’s BBQ.

Snowbirding 101 Featured Image

Snowbirding With Your RV

What does it mean to call someone a snowbird?

The term “snowbird” is used to describe travelers that like to migrate to a warmer climate for the winter months. Often, snowbirds consist of active adults and pairs of retirees who tend to start their travels between November and January. Several well-established snowbirds will stay up to three months at their desired destination, but newer snowbirds might only stay one to two months. Knowing what to pack and where the best snowbird destination and campgrounds are are just two of the many things that go into making your winter getaway a success.

Check out our list of tips and tricks on how to be the best snowbird you can be!

Getting Started Out As A Snowbird

Many successful snowbirds, especially those who choose to stay long-term, learn to fall in love with their adoptive state. When you visit the same location year after year, you create a social network and become integrated into the community. This is how several snowbirds start their progress toward an official permanent relocation. Don’t be afraid to put yourself out there and say hello to fellow travelers! The RV community is a friendly one and as you first start out in the lifestyle, you will be grateful for all the new connections and friendships formed.

Wondering if snowbirding is a good lifestyle for you? Start out slow! Beginners will often rent first or stay with friends or family to test out the ways before deciding to purchase a camper equipped for extended stays or full-time living. Contact a local real estate agent who will be happy to assist you in finding a short-term rental to test out the area with a condo, apartment or home rental before setting roots. You may also have luck looking into long-term RV rentals allowing you to still enjoy the flexibility of RV travel.

Popular Snowbird Destinations

One of the most popular snowbird destinations is the Sunshine State. Florida has been a retirement destination for years which is reflected by the number of active adult communities spread across the state. Several people choose to travel to Florida for the beaches, affordable housing options, and comfortable coastal climate. Florida’s east coast has the highest concentration of long-stay properties and is decorated with several miles of gorgeous beaches. You are also relatively close to Miami and Orlando which means there is an abundance of activities to do and places to see. Florida’s west coast is also known as the “Nature Coast” and is full of wetlands and bayous. The central part of the state has over 37 golf courses but remains one of the most popular vacation destinations due to its proximity to Walt Disney World.

Another popular destination is Arizona which allows travelers to enjoy the resort-style golf courses and unique scenic landscapes. Phoenix offers snowbirds access to fantastic restaurants and entertainment and is positioned perfectly for quick trips to California, Nevada, or New Mexico. Scottsdale is one of the biggest resort areas in the USA and has championship golf courses, upscale restaurants, and relaxing spas. Glendale, AZ is home to Camelback Ranch, the Chicago White Sox, and Los Angeles Dodgers spring training facilities making it a dream destination for any sports enthusiast.

A few other states that rank amongst the most popular snowbird destinations and campgrounds include California, Nevada, South Carolina, and North Carolina. Before you embark on your journey be sure to research the best places to stay and make reservations early!

Snowbird Checklist

Are you ready to say goodbye to your winter coat and hello to warm, beautiful weather? Whether it is your first trip as a snowbird or your 100th, knowing what to pack can be overwhelming.

What should I pack?

  • Important documents such as your passport, ID, health insurance, and car insurance policy information
  • Necessary medical information such as your prescriptions.
    Tip: If you have medications you take daily, be sure you find a pharmacy at your travel destination to be able to get them filled.
  • Clothing layers in case the weather shifts and becomes cold or rainy
  • Pet supplies such as food, medications, and leashes if traveling with furry friends
  • Outdoor gear specific to your destination such as hiking and sporting equipment
  • Electronics and any work/office supplies for individuals who may work remote
    Tip: Don’t forget chargers and adapters!

If you are renting an RV or property, be sure to double-check beforehand that all your desired food prep and bathroom appliances, toiletries, and accommodations such as sheets, towels and blankets are provided.

For more RV travel tips and road trip resources, read more from the ROUTE 66 RV Network Blog now!

rv types

Which Type of RV is Best For You?

Finding the right RV for you and your family can be challenging. There are many options to choose from. So, how do you know which RV is the best choice for your lifestyle? Keep reading to learn more about the different recreational vehicle types and discover which is best for your next adventure.

Motorized vs Towable

There are two different categories of RVs: motorized vehicles and towables.

Motorized vehicles, otherwise known as motorhomes, provide living and driving functions under a single roof and take the hassle out of hitching and towing. Motorhomes are great for first-time RVers who might not be the most comfortable maneuvering with a second vehicle in tow. There are three types of motorhomes: Class A Motorhomes, Class B Motorhomes, and Class C Motorhomes.

Towables, also called trailers, require a vehicle to tow them from place to place. Trailers are usually cheaper than motorhomes, and once you reach your final destination you can easily unhitch your vehicle, allowing you to have a set of wheels to easily explore the area outside your campsite. There are five towable RVs to choose from: travel trailers, fifth wheels, toy haulers, pop-up campers, and truck campers.

Now let’s take a closer look.

Class A Motorhomes (Motorized)

Class A Motorhomes are built on heavy-duty frames and are the largest motorhomes on the road. They typically range between 21 and 45 feet in length and are built on a special chassis. You and your family will have plenty of room to stretch out in the roomy living areas and will feel at home with several amenities included in the motorhome, no matter where you are.

class a motorhome

Class B Motorhomes (Motorized)

Class B Motorhomes are also known as “camper vans” as they drive more similarly to a van due to being built on a standard van chassis. Living quarters are smaller since these motorized vehicles are more compact, but this does make them typically easier to drive. If you and your family love going on day trips or are spontaneous travelers, then a Class B Motorhome is a perfect choice.

class b motorhome

Class C Motorhomes (Motorized)

Class C Motorhomes combine the top features of Class A’s and Class B’s into one mid-sized recreational vehicle. These motorhomes usually range from 20 to 33 feet in length and are built on a truck or van chassis. Many Class C owners tow their cars along to make running errands and day excursions easier.

Travel Trailers (Towable)

When it comes to Travel Trailers there are several different options to choose from. These RVs commonly offer a wide variety of amenities and floor plans making it easy to find a model that best fits your lifestyle and needs. Some larger models may have bunks, known as bunkhouse models, which can sleep between four and ten people,  and some smaller trailers may only offer sleeping space for one to two people. Travel trailers can be towed by any vehicle that can handle their weight capacity.

travel trailer

Fifth Wheels (Towable)

Fifth Wheels are the largest, most expensive, and therefore most luxurious of the towable recreational vehicles. Due to the fact that these trailers are around 20 to 40 feet in length, these trailers must be towed by a large truck or a conversion vehicle. Fifth Wheel Trailers connect to your tow vehicle by a “gooseneck” extension which fits into a space in the bed of your vehicle. These towables typically have large kitchens and bathrooms, plenty of storage space and more sleeping room.

fifth wheel

Toy Haulers (Towable)

Toy Haulers are designed to allow you to bring extra toys along like jet skis, ATVs, motorcycles, or even bikes and kayaks. These trailers are split into two sections: the front living quarters and the rear section featuring a pull-down ramp. If you and your adventure buddies like to bring extra camping gear along on trips, then a toy hauler is a great option.

toy hauler

Pop-Up Campers (Towable)

These compact trailers feature expandable side sections that are folded down during transportation and allow for easy camping. The hard-bodied central area contains a simple kitchen and a bathroom, and the expandable sides convert into sleeping areas. These trailers can be towed by most mid-sized vehicles by a ball hitch receiver. Pop-up campers, sometimes also referred to as fold-down campers, are a perfect option for those looking to upgrade from tents and sleeping bags while camping.

pop up camper

Truck Campers (Towable)

Truck campers are economical and easy to drive since they attach to an everyday pickup truck. These campers usually sleep two to four people depending on the model, and offer campers a small cooking, bath, and storage area. If you are a spontaneous traveler or weekend warrior who prefers affordability over luxurious amenities, this towable RV is the one for you!

Visit a ROUTE 66 RV Network Dealer near you to purchase the RV you have been looking for. Our network of independently-owned RV dealerships are here to help you!

10 Stops on Route 66 in Oklahoma

If you’re planning a trip through the Midwest down U.S. Highway 66, be sure to add stops in Oklahoma to your list. From the large Buck Atom statue to vintage motorcycles, there is so much to see and do. Take a look at our list of the 10 best stops along Route 66 in the Sooner State!

Route 66 Vintage Iron Motorcycle Museum

You can enter Vintage Iron at no cost, but they do gratefully accept donations. This museum features vintage motorcycles from Harley, Ducati and Indian. Bike enthusiasts are sure to be impressed by an original 1917 Harley Davidson, and don’t forget to check out the X-rays from Evel Knievel. Consider purchasing a vintage motorcycle t-shirt or a piece of Route 66 memorabilia from the gift shop during your visit!

Afton Station and Route 66 Packards

The Afton Station is a small, private antique car and Route 66 memorabilia museum that is located in a 30s-era restored filling station. This car museum holds up to 14 vintage automobiles and unique, interesting memorabilia.

The Coleman Theatre

The Coleman Theater was donated to the City of Miami by the Coleman family in 1989 and has been beautifully restored to its former glory. It originally opened in 1929 as a theatre and movie palace and was designed to bring a touch of glamour to the city. The theatre is now open for tours and is packed with stories regarding its supernatural history and past glories.

The Round Barn

Originally built in 1898, this barn is 60’ in diameter and 45’ in height, and the town of Arcadia, Oklahoma claims it to be the only “true” round barn. Since then, it has been restored to its previous glory and the loft space can be rented for events. The Round Barn is a unique stop along Route 66!

Cyrus Avery Centennial Plaza

The Cyrus Avery Centennial Plaza aims to celebrate the achievements of Cyrus Avery, who is often credited as the “Father of Route 66”. The plaza features the flags of the eight states along Route 66, bronze statues including an old automobile featuring Will Rogers, and additional conveniences such as the Route 66 Skywalk, a park, and a pedestrian walkway.

Blue Whale

This whale was built in the early ‘70s as an anniversary gift from Hugh Davis to his wife, Zelta. The Blue Whale of Catoosa used to serve locals and Route 66 travelers as a place to swim, fish and picnic. Although swimming is no longer permitted, this whale has been given a new coat of paint and the picnic area has been restored in recent years. This smiling attraction welcomes all visitors driving down Route 66 in Oklahoma – stop to say hello!

National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum

The National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum has over 28,000 exhibits that celebrate Western and American Indian culture. It also holds a huge collection of artworks and historical artifacts including the American Cowboy Gallery, the American Rodeo Gallery, the Native American Gallery, and the Weitzenhoffer Gallery of Fine American Firearms. You can also visit Prosperity Junction, a 14,000-square-foot authentic Western prairie town.

Route 66 Museum

The Route 66 Museum covers over 60 years of the U.S. Highway 66’s history. This museum showcases vehicles, artifacts, photographs, and an audio tour narrated by Michael Wallis, the author of Route 66: The Mother Road. This is a fun stop for you and your family and several efforts have been made to ensure that the exhibits are both eye-catching and informative.

Sandhills Curiosity Shop

The Sandhills Curiosity Shop is located in the City Meat Market, Erick, Oklahoma’s oldest building. It contains a crazy assortment of Route 66 memorabilia and became well-known thanks to its owners, Harley and Annabelle, who spontaneously burst into song and provide performances for all visitors.

Lucille’s Gas Stationbuck-atom

From 1941 to 2000, Lucille Hamon operated this tiny gas station and was often referred to as the “Mother of the Mother Road,” thanks to her hospitality to Route 66 travelers. Since then, it has been restored including a marker that tells the story of Lucille and her family. This stop is also a great photo opportunity along U.S. Route 66!

Camping Essentials For Beginners

Being equipped with camping essentials can make your trip and time in the great outdoors a lot less stressful and more enjoyable. Whether you are a seasoned camper or a first-timer, make sure to not leave your home without these essential camping items.

Water Bottle

Having a water bottle while camping, or being outdoors in general, is super important. Check out this list of the best water bottles for the outdoors to keep you from longing for a sip of water when heat or exhaustion hits. Having water purification tablets or a filter with you when exploring is also smart in case you run out of fresh water and need to drink from an open water source.

First Aid Kit

It is always important to bring a first aid kit along while camping to tend to any minor bumps or cuts. Long days of hiking can lead to blisters. Climbing through brush and nature can leave you scraped up. Your first aid kit should include scissors, gauze, bandages, a CPR mouth barrier, and a whistle. Bringing a flare or flare gun is another smart item to bring along in case you become lost. Need help finding the best kit for your camping supplies? These are a few of the best first aid kits on the market!

Pocket Knife

A pocket knife is the ultimate tool to have with you in the outdoors. They can be used to cut rope or fishing line, open sealed packages and even assist in meal preparation. A small knife comes in handy when you least expect it, and be your savior in many unpredictable situations. Check out this list of some of the best pocket knives for sale that you should carry with you.

Tent

Even if you are traveling in an RV, having a tent is always handy because you never know when adventure may strike. Tent camping is often a cherished memory amongst families with small kids. Be sure to bring along the necessary tent accessories such as poles, ropes, and stakes. To protect yourself from exposure to low temperatures and pesky bugs, you might also benefit from a sleeping bag. Take a look at these top-selling camping tents and high-quality sleeping bags.

All-Weather Clothing

When you’re camping or on a short, weekend outdoors trip, you might only have a few pairs of clothes to wear. Clothing that is equipped for several weather conditions is smart, preparing you for rain, heat, snow or any other condition that may get thrown at you while in the great outdoors. When choosing a rain jacket to pack, make sure it is lightweight because wet gear can be very heavy to carry in a backpack. Need help finding the best all-weather clothing? Here is the best all-weather clothing for your next camping trip.

Flashlight

The campfire might be bright but doesn’t allow you to illuminate your paths and surroundings. A flashlight not only keeps you safe while moving through the dark but also can be handy for other occasions. Your best flashlight option for camping should be battery-powered with a bright wide beam of light. You can also bring a headlamp with you for hands-free convenience and functionality. Check out this list of some of the best quality and affordable flashlights.

As you gear up for your next camping trip, consider bringing one or all of these items with you. You never know what will get thrown your way while out on the road. It is always better to be safe than sorry when being out in nature with your friends and family. Happy camping!

10 Stops on Route 66 in Illinois

The state of Illinois is known for many things like the city of Chicago and turning the river green for Saint Patrick’s Day, but did you know they also have a ton of cool Route 66 stops? Next time you are driving through the Prairie State, be sure to check out one or all of these awesome stops along the Mother Road. 

360 Chicago

360 ChicagoFormerly The John Hancock Observatory, 360 Chicago is a 100-floor skyscraper in Chicago’s commercial district. Head up to their 94th-floor observation deck to see exhibits on the city of Chicago and look at the maps that explain the view in each direction. There is also a special meshed-in area that allows visitors to feel the winds of the city 1,030 feet above ground level. If you are feeling brave, experience TILT which is an exhilarating downward view of Chicago.

Country Classic Cars

This stop on Route 66 started as a weekend hobby for a Midwest farmer. However, that changed when a piece of land on I-55, just off of Route 66, became available and Country Classic Cars was born. This is not only a large display of classic cars and trucks but is also a service area, showroom and historic gift shop.

Illinois State Capitol Building

Springfield, Illinois is a pilgrimage site for people who want to celebrate the life of Abraham Lincoln. This city is the location of Lincoln’s home and tomb as well as the location of the State Capitol building. This building is beautiful and is found in the heart of Springfield with free entry to visitors.

Lincoln’s Home

In 1844, Lincoln and his wife Mary Todd Lincoln purchased a home, and it was the only home that Lincoln ever owned. While living in the home, he was elected to the House of Representatives in 1846 and then President in 1860. The home, located in downtown Springfield, Illinois, has been restored to look just as it did in the mid-1800s and is open to the public for viewing. Tickets to the house are free on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Odell Station

This Odell Station opened in 1932 as a gas station but stopped serving gas in the mid-1960s. Serving a short period as a body shop in the ‘70s, the station has been restored by the Illinois Route 66 Association and their Preservation Committee as a popular stop along the famed highway welcoming all Route 66 travelers.

Henry’s Rabbit Ranch

Henry’s Rabbit Ranch is a tourist center on U.S. Highway 66, located in a replica of an old gas station featuring rusted gas pumps and over a dozen Volkswagen Rabbits. While visiting the center, you can check out Route 66 memorabilia and play with rabbits – the furry kind!

Route 66 Association Hall of Fame & Museum

The Route 66 Association Hall of Fame & Museum features thousands of artifacts and pieces of memorabilia including the bus and van of Route 66 artist and icon, Bob Waldmire. Stop in to learn the history of one of the most important highways in the U.S. and snap a picture in front of the largest Route 66 Shield mural painted on the back wall of the museum.

Navy Pier

Navy Pier is a 1000m long pier located along the Chicago shoreline of Lake Michigan. It has various attractions including sightseeing tours, dinner cruises, restaurants, shops, and fairground rides like the Centennial Wheel. The pier features a firework display on Wednesday and Sunday nights throughout the summer, and Friday and Saturday nights during the fall season.

Ambler’s Texaco Gas Station

This gas station has been identified as the longest operating gas station along U.S. Highway 66 dispensing fuel up until 1999 – 66 years of service! Ambler’s was the focal point of major restoration work from 2005-2007 and reopened as a Route 66 visitor’s center in May 2007. The community has done a fantastic job in restoring this gas station to its original glory and is staffed with knowledgeable volunteers.

The Muffler Men

The Muffler Men, previously used by businesses for promotional purposes, tower 14 to 25 feet tall alongside U.S. Highway 66 throughout Illinois. The Paul Bunyon Statue can’t be missed when driving past Atlanta, IL. The Gemini Giant stands alongside the Launching Pad Drive-In in Wilmington, IL. The Lauterbach Tire Man is found right outside Lauterbach Tires on Wabash Ave in Springfield. Keep an eye out for these 3 Route 66 icons!